WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) is a wireless communications standard designed to provide 30 to 40 megabit-per-second data rates, with the 2011 update providing up to 1 Gbit/s for fixed stations. WiMAX refers to interoperable implementations of the IEEE 802.16 family of wireless-networks standards ratified by the WiMAX Forum. WiMAX can provide at-home or mobile Internet access across whole cities or countries. In many cases this has resulted in competition in markets which typically only had access through an existing incumbent DSL (or similar) operator.

The bandwidth and range of WiMAX make it suitable for the following potential applications:

  • Providing portable mobile broadband connectivity across cities and countries through a variety of devices.
  • Providing a wireless alternative to cable and digital subscriber line (DSL) for “last mile” broadband access.
  • Providing data, telecommunications (VoIP) and IPTV services (triple play).
  • Providing a source of Internet connectivity as part of a business continuity plan.
  • Smart grids and metering

Mobile WiMAX was a replacement candidate for cellular phone technologies such as GSM and CDMA, or can be used as an overlay to increase capacity. Fixed WiMAX is also considered as a wireless backhaul technology for 2G, 3G, and 4G networks in both developed and developing nations. Devices that provide connectivity to a WiMAX network are known as subscriber stations (SS). Portable units include handsets (similar to cellular smartphones); PC peripherals (PC Cards or USB dongles); and embedded devices in laptops, which are now available for Wi-Fi services. In addition, there is much emphasis by operators on consumer electronics devices such as Gaming consoles, MP3 players and similar devices. WiMAX is more similar to Wi-Fi than to other 3G cellular technologies. USB can provide connectivity to a WiMAX network through what is called a dongle. Generally these devices are connected to a notebook or net book computer. Dongles typically have omnidirectional antennas which are of lower gain compared to other devices. As such these devices are best used in areas of good coverage. Mobile_wimax_usb

Comparisons and confusion between WiMAX and Wi-Fi are frequent, because both are related to wireless connectivity and Internet access.

  • WiMAX is a long range system, covering many kilometres, that uses licensed or unlicensed spectrum to deliver connection to a network, in most cases the Internet.
  • Wi-Fi uses the 2.4 GHz, 3 GHz, 5 GHz, and 60 GHz radio frequency bands to provide access to a local network.
  • Wi-Fi is more popular in end-user devices.
  • Wi-Fi runs on the Media Access Control’s CSMA/CA protocol, which is connectionless and contention based, whereas WiMAX runs a connection-oriented MAC.
  • WiMAX and Wi-Fi have quite different quality of service (QoS) mechanisms:
    • WiMAX uses a QoS mechanism based on connections between the base station and the user device. Each connection is based on specific scheduling algorithms.
    • Wi-Fi uses contention access — all subscriber stations that wish to pass data through a wireless access point (AP) are competing for the AP’s attention on a random interrupt basis. This can cause subscriber stations distant from the AP to be repeatedly interrupted by closer stations, greatly reducing their throughput.
  • Both IEEE 802.11, which includes Wi-Fi, and IEEE 802.16, which includes WiMAX, define Peer-to-Peer (P2P) and wireless ad hoc networks, where an end user communicates to users or servers on another Local Area Network (LAN) using its access point or base station. However, 802.11 supports also direct ad hoc or peer to peer networking between end user devices without an access point while 802.16 end user devices must be in range of the base station.

Although Wi-Fi and WiMAX are designed for different situations, they are complementary. WiMAX network operators typically provide a WiMAX Subscriber Unit that connects to the metropolitan WiMAX network and provides Wi-Fi connectivity within the home or business for local devices, e.g., computers, Wi-Fi handsets and smartphones. This enables the user to place the WiMAX Subscriber Unit in the best reception area, such as a window, and still be able to use the WiMAX network from any place within their residence.

The local area network inside one’s house or business would operate as with any other wired or wireless network. If one were to connect the WiMAX Subscriber Unit directly to a WiMAX-enabled computer, that would limit access to a single device. As an alternative for a LAN, one could purchase a WiMAX modem with a built-in wireless Wi-Fi router, allowing one to connect multiple devices to create a LAN.

Using WiMAX could be an advantage, since it is typically faster than most cable modems with download speeds between 3 and 6 Mbit/s, and generally costs less than cable.

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